nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

This is icon for social networking website. Th...

Reddit (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

(Thank you, Sam)

About two years ago I discovered reddit with one purpose: to advertise my blog. Guess how long it took for me to be ‘shadow banned’. Go ahead, guess.

(The answer is, I don’t know either, but I know I only had it lifted this weekend when I asked).

I know reddit has been in the news this years for two separate reasons: The notoriety of a redditer who was posting suggestive pictures of minors without their or their parents’ consent, and the tragic suicide of Aaron Swartz, who had a great deal to do with the rise of reddit.

Honestly, these aren’t the reasons that I went back. In fact, that skeevy redditer was a reason for me to avoid the service. And then a Facebook friend a generation younger than I am posted on her timeline how much fun she was having wandering around reddit…

Which led me to want to advertise on it. (Still not getting it)…

Read the rest of this entry »

nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

Deadly Sin Wrath

Aw, hell. I was in the middle of this post about wrath when Sandy Hook Elementary school in Newtown,  Connecticut became the victim of  a mass killing of (among others) kindergarten students. I have completed my original thoughts, but have added, in the context of today’s events, a comment about what happened. It’s at the end of this post.

I started this series with wrath because it is perhaps the most deadly of the deadly sins — and not just because people who live in anger have a greater tendency to commit murders.  Anger creates a condition of continual stress in your body, which, over time, causes heart disease, high blood pressure, and other physical ailments.

Anger vs. Wrath

When people come to a therapist, they usually have one of three emotions that they are trying to ‘get rid of’: anger, fear, or sadness. Leaving aside for a second that “getting rid of”

deadly sin wrath

Pieter Bruegel the Elder: The Seven Deadly Sins or the Seven Vices – Anger (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

an emotion is not the answer, the key here is that anger is one of the top three most miserable emotions to live with… and it’s even more complicated than that.

Anger is almost always tied up very tightly with anxiety. Sometimes the anger attempts to hide the fear, and sometimes the fear is desperately covering up deep rage, but they appear to be paired in many, many people.

On top of its marriage to anxiety, anger also sometimes serves an important function, by giving energy to people who are paralyzed by fear or depression, to function at a more or less ‘normal level’.

Anger is a useful emotion.

That bears repeating: Anger is a useful emotion. Which is why I tell people I will not help them get rid of it, only to use it better.

It can help you identify wrongs in your life. Is someone consistently treating you with disrespect? Anger will let you know, if you let it. Are you being asked to do more than your fair share at home or work? Anger will give you a heads up. Are someone’s lies hurting you? Anger will tell you (if you let it).

Read the rest of this entry »

nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

Combating the Death of American Education

Combating the Death of American Education

I recently read an article (linked below the fold) about the deliberate destruction of the US post secondary education system. I would go farther and say that the same people who are deliberately destroying public post secondary education are deliberately manufacturing the death of American education in general (with the exception of private schools).

Read the rest of this entry »

nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

 Getting Rid of Welfare

Lots of people talk about how poor people ‘rip off’ the system and how money is ‘wasted’ on programs for the poor. There is a lot of emotional energy invested in these arguments, and people get loud, and start shouting over each other, and friendships end over discussions of why poor people don’t ‘deserve’ help.

So let’s not go that route. I want to ask you a question, instead. How will you benefit from getting rid of welfare? Lets imagine a world in which ‘entitlements’ for the poor in America have been eliminated, and give it about twenty years for the results to show.*

Read the rest of this entry »

nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

Share Button

Cool friends who make stuff

I have been so busy today completely reorganizing and categorizing the site (look, see? much easier to navigate, more relevant categories. Really nifty, if I say so myself) that I don’t have time to write a real post. So instead, I’m going to introduce you to my cool friends who make stuff. If you like it, please buy it, and support small business.

This post was originally spawned by filkertom (Tom Smith) who writes and performs filk songs (no, not folk, filk — they are based off science fiction and fantasy, done in a folk song style). What he linked to wasn’t actually his (oh, the stars, the STARS! and the link plays music, too,) but in payment for pointing me to it, I’m linking to his buy stuff page at his website. Making music costs time and money. Please buy his stuff or subscribe to his streams. And I dare you to watch this video without laughing:

Read the rest of this entry »

nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

Share Button

living wageWhen you find me struggling with the obvious on wage and labor issues, remember that I spent nearly a decade as a libertarian before I slowly, painfully reasoned my way back to a supporter of a well regulated economy with capitalism as the engine and liberalism as a steering wheel.

A friend who is deeply involved in the Occupy movement posted the picture to the left on Facebook a couple of days ago, and it let loose a cascade of thoughts that drew a little of that old poison from my wounds.

My old reactionary core rose up in protest. Really? You’re going to go there? And then I paused. It’s a really good question. Its opposite is asked many, many times in libertarian and conservative circles. At what point is taxation theft? And if it is always theft, then why is it not also theft to take the benefits of another person’s labor, and profit from it? 

Read the rest of this entry »

nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

Share Button

anger and forgiveness

Tbird is the guest author of this post about anger and forgiveness. She recently completed her conversion to Judaism after years of study. Originally from New York, she now lives outside Denver Colorado and has a Bachelor’s of Science in Psychology from Colorado State University in Fort Collins. She has also been my friend for many years and is a constant inspiration to me. I hope you find her as inspiring as I do. 

Many belief systems call on us to seek out one another’s humanity, even in the darkness of people. We are asked to find a spark in the people who would hurt us or others.

The Quaker belief is that every life has value.

Universal Unitarianism holds the principle of “affirming and upholding the inherent worth and dignity of every person” at the top of their list.

As humans in the West, we are constantly told to be good, be polite, be kind to strangers, know compassion, let go of anger, and forgive. This is hard to reconcile when we know there is evil in the world; there are people who hurt children, murder neighbors, or think it’s a good idea to barbecue live kittens. How are we supposed to be nice, to affirm the inherent worth of such people?

In Judaism, the good and the bad both have a place. There is room for both anger and forgiveness.

Read the rest of this entry »

nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

Share Button

Help to use RSS-feed

I got a shock the other day when I discovered that despite being one of the older and easier ways of finding things on the web, more than half of regular internet users polled didn’t know what RSS was, let alone how to use RSS, and less than 20% use it regularly (and darn it, I can’t find the source that shocked me. Help please?)

How to Use RSS

RSS is really simple to use. In fact, two thirds of ‘RSS’ are ‘really simple’, and the whole thing is ‘really simple syndication’. You can even use it inside Facebook, though honestly I can’t recommend that any more, now that Facebook has decided that it knows better than you do which of your friends and pages you really want to see. (More on that later).

It’s a huge time saver, and available in mobile as well as large formats.

Imagine for a second that you can put together your own magazine of your favorite sites on the web, automatically updated for you every time there is a new post, and attractively arranged for you to read on your choice of dozens of different formats. There is no need to imagine – that’s what RSS is.

This is how to use RSS:

  1. Choose a feed reader (that’s what you call the magazine). The most popular one is probably Google Reader, but there are lots of others out there, most of them free. Pick one that suits you and set up an account. I like Google Reader because I’m already signed in to Google most of the time anyway, can be adjusted by a ton of various browser extensions, and has built in a feature called ‘Reader Play‘ that makes it feel even more like a magazine.
  2. How to use RSSStart adding feeds. Feeds are updates to your favorite blogs and websites that will now be automatically be delivered to your reader. Do you see that nifty orange and white icon up in the top right hand corner of my website? (The one that looks just like the one to the left, there.) That’s an RSS icon. Click on it, and it will invite you to add my feed to your reader, and give you choices as to which reader you use. A second click confirms your choice (it’ll navigate you away from here, so be sure to come back).Look for more feeds. Most websites have a feed, but not all of them are nice enough to make sure that their orange and white RSS icon is easy to find. So you can download extensions for Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome to make it easier.
  3. Read RSS on your phone or tablet. I use an Android app called NewsRob on mine to read my Google Reader account, which is synced between my phone, my tablet, and my computer. It has a free version, but I like the benefits of the paid version enough to have upgraded. There are lots of others for Android and Iphone around as well.
  4. A word of warning: If you use an RSS feed reader on your work computer, your IT department will see it as you browsing hundreds of websites, not one. You really don’t want to be in the position of explaining to your boss that you’re just skimming headlines looking for articles to read on your break (even if its true). I bet you can guess how I learned that one.

So why not Facebook? Don’t get me wrong. I like Facebook. I think, on balance, it’s more helpful than not despite some jerkishness on the part of Zuckerman et al. But Facebook started, in spring of 2012, to decide for you which of your friends and pages are valuable to you, on an algorithm that isn’t close to perfect. It had two purposes in this.

First, it was trying to ensure that you saw first the articles you wanted most to read – your closest friends, your favorite pages – but second, it was increasing revenue for itself.

It is now significantly more expensive for advertisers to use Facebok. It used to be an ‘organic’ way to discover new pages, where you just kind of ‘naturally’ picked them up. Now Facebook deliberately makes it harder for you to find new pages, and the owners of the pages need to pay Facebook for the privilege of making it easier to find them.

I don’t blame Facebook for wanting to make a buck. They’re not in it for charity, after all. But speaking as someone trying to get people to read my website, they are now a very expensive option, rather than an inexpensive one, to let people know about my site.

RSS doesn’t exactly advertise my website or anyone elses’, but it does make it really simple for people who already want to read it to find the new articles I post nearly every day. Really simple syndication – and yet most people who are on the web haven’t figured out how to use it on a regular basis.

Oh, and if you’re curious, my own RSS feed of other peoples’ stuff is fed to the left hand column on my site pages (‘below the fold’ a bit), listed as ‘blogroll’, and the most recent couple of articles are linked on my curated life page (which, unfortunately, is glitchy because of the app used to set it up. Looking for better. Help?). Feel free to add any or all of them to your feed. Happy reading!

Enhanced by Zemanta
nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

Share Button

The Essential Thanksgiving

 

Turkey, despite all rumors to the contrary, is not essential to Thanksgiving, even in the US. Blasphemy, right? Thanksgiving is a harvest festival, and of course the fruits of harvest are important to the festival, but it is more than that. The essential Thanksgiving doesn’t require particular foods or table settings, but these ideals. 

Read the rest of this entry »

nunila: (Default)

Originally published at Am I the Only One Dancing?. Please leave any comments there.

Share Button
Nuni, Chloe and Maureen at Renfest

Nuni, on the left, was a pirate princess that year. The headless wench is me. On the right is Chloe, who is not nearly as fond of dressing up and thus isn’t ‘asked to.

This has been a year of many losses for me, of two legged friends and four, and I always, on  or about Halloween, which is Samhain in the Celtic calendar, and the day before the Day of the Dead celebrate the lives of those I have lost. Remembering that shared pain is lessened, I recall them.

Some I cannot name. Confidentiality does not end with death, so the two therapy participants or family members of participants cannot be named, but I do honor them.

In addition, my husband’s grandfather, David Martin, a bomber pilot in WWII and lifelong curmudgeon extraordinaire, died this summer at the age of 95, having outlived his beloved wife ‘Bertie’ by nearly a decade. 

Read the rest of this entry »

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
2324 2526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags