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promise of spring

Today is a holiday in many traditions. The United States celebrates it as Groundhog’s Day, a completely secular holiday with deeply pagan roots. Many Christians celebrate today as Candlemas or St. Brigid‘s day, or Lady Day, which is a festival in honor of Mary. Celtic pagans celebrate today as Imbolc, or ‘ewe’s milk’ day, which celebrates that lambing season has begun and spring is on its way.

Today is the midpoint between winter and spring. Spring isn’t here yet, but the promise of spring is. It is a good day for starting early seeds, plants that can be put out at first thaw, such as cabbages and lettuces and onions and broccoli. It is a good day for lighting a whole lot of candles and being grateful that the sun no longer sets (what feels like) a half second after it rises. It is a good day for sitting in front of a warm fire and planning out your year.

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Highclere Castle

Highclere Castle (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

If you have not already discovered Downton Abbey (and if not, why not?), it is a British period television show filmed at Highclere Castle in England that begins on the morning after the Titanic sinks and continues to follow the Earl and Lady Grantham (‘the Crawley family’) and their staff and the people of their estate through the next few decades.

The show examines class and wealth and privilege while providing an entertaining and intelligent human drama that is set firmly in place and time. The relationships are interesting and complicated, and for those of us who like pretty things, there is plenty of eye candy to be had.

Viewers who watch in Great Britain get to watch each season approximately six months ahead of those in America (except for those industrious enough to track down a British version of the show). As an American, I am (usually) patient enough to wait until it comes over the airwaves here, so currently I am on episode three of season three.

I’m going to break the question set in two, one for those who have never seen the series, and one for those who have. Please, no season 3 spoilers in the comments, as I know there are fans from all over the world who read the posts here.

If you have never seen Downton Abbey:

  • From what you have heard of the series, what appeals to you? What doesn’t appeal to you?
  • Are you thinking of watching it at some point, or are you just sick of listening to us enthusiastic fans?
  • Do you like period pieces in general or is that one of the reasons you haven’t watched the show?
  • Are there access problems keeping you from watching the show? Is it not available locally to you or are there financial issues?
  • Is it on your ‘to watch’ list?
  • Do you like to wait to watch some series so that you can watch them ‘all at once’?
  • What would it take for someone to convince you to watch it right now, today?

If you watch Downton Abbey:

  • Who is your favorite character? Why?
  • What storyline do you find most believable? Least believable?
  • How well do you think the series handles the class issues it attempts to portray? What does it do well? What could it do better?
  • If you were a new character in Downton Abbey, who would you be and how would you be introduced?
  • Imagining yourself in the life of one of the staff members, how would that compare to a working or middle class job today? Easier or harder? In what ways?
  • Imagine yourself one of the nobility of that time. Do you think that Downton Abbey ‘soft pedals’ the attitude of the aristocracy to the people of their estates and to their servants?
  • In what ways are the women in the series more alike than different despite class?
  • In what ways are the men in the series more alike than different despite class?
  • How different is the world of Downton Abbey from today’s world? How is it similar?
  • What do you find funny in the show? Tragic? Heartwarming? (remember, no season 3 spoilers)

As with every other Today’s Dance, feel free to ponder your responses silently, leave them below, and share them with friends using the buttons at the bottom of the post.

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Two apple trees, coated in ice following an ic...

Two apple trees, coated in ice following an ice storm, with the sun shining bright in the afternoon sky. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

As I write this, the weather forecast is predicting we will get 1-4 inches of snow on top of a day’s worth of rain that will turn in to a sheet of ice when the temperature plummets in about an hour. I have lived in climates where it snows from around October through April, and climates that never see snow at all.

Where I live now, we get ice storms nearly as much as we get snow storms, and believe me, ice storms are worse. And during those snow storms and ice storms, I used to sit comfy and warm at home, an unexpected day off school, and read, and scrawl in my journal, and look out the windows at the snow covered beauty of the day, made all the more beautiful because I didn’t have to go anywhere through it.

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Today's Dance

Introducing Today’s Dance

Today’s Dance is a new feature on Am I the Only One Dancing? Using current news, pop culture, geek culture, or miscellaneous interesting things in the world, I will create a question set to spark a discussion among readers. It will be posted each morning and you are encouraged to join in and share your experiences and opinions.

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I was exhausted last night and didn’t get my post ready for today. Here is something interesting and useful about the empathic nature of society to tide you over until I get home from work tonight and finish my post on Wrath, the first of the (Christian) Deadly Sins.

I’m interested in your thoughts on his reasoning (RSA Animate has tons of thoughtful videos out there… I invite you to ‘waste’ a day wandering through them.)

Also, this:

Empathy and Civilization

Cover via Amazon

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Combating the Death of American Education

Combating the Death of American Education

I recently read an article (linked below the fold) about the deliberate destruction of the US post secondary education system. I would go farther and say that the same people who are deliberately destroying public post secondary education are deliberately manufacturing the death of American education in general (with the exception of private schools).

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Help to use RSS-feed

I got a shock the other day when I discovered that despite being one of the older and easier ways of finding things on the web, more than half of regular internet users polled didn’t know what RSS was, let alone how to use RSS, and less than 20% use it regularly (and darn it, I can’t find the source that shocked me. Help please?)

How to Use RSS

RSS is really simple to use. In fact, two thirds of ‘RSS’ are ‘really simple’, and the whole thing is ‘really simple syndication’. You can even use it inside Facebook, though honestly I can’t recommend that any more, now that Facebook has decided that it knows better than you do which of your friends and pages you really want to see. (More on that later).

It’s a huge time saver, and available in mobile as well as large formats.

Imagine for a second that you can put together your own magazine of your favorite sites on the web, automatically updated for you every time there is a new post, and attractively arranged for you to read on your choice of dozens of different formats. There is no need to imagine – that’s what RSS is.

This is how to use RSS:

  1. Choose a feed reader (that’s what you call the magazine). The most popular one is probably Google Reader, but there are lots of others out there, most of them free. Pick one that suits you and set up an account. I like Google Reader because I’m already signed in to Google most of the time anyway, can be adjusted by a ton of various browser extensions, and has built in a feature called ‘Reader Play‘ that makes it feel even more like a magazine.
  2. How to use RSSStart adding feeds. Feeds are updates to your favorite blogs and websites that will now be automatically be delivered to your reader. Do you see that nifty orange and white icon up in the top right hand corner of my website? (The one that looks just like the one to the left, there.) That’s an RSS icon. Click on it, and it will invite you to add my feed to your reader, and give you choices as to which reader you use. A second click confirms your choice (it’ll navigate you away from here, so be sure to come back).Look for more feeds. Most websites have a feed, but not all of them are nice enough to make sure that their orange and white RSS icon is easy to find. So you can download extensions for Internet Explorer, Firefox, or Chrome to make it easier.
  3. Read RSS on your phone or tablet. I use an Android app called NewsRob on mine to read my Google Reader account, which is synced between my phone, my tablet, and my computer. It has a free version, but I like the benefits of the paid version enough to have upgraded. There are lots of others for Android and Iphone around as well.
  4. A word of warning: If you use an RSS feed reader on your work computer, your IT department will see it as you browsing hundreds of websites, not one. You really don’t want to be in the position of explaining to your boss that you’re just skimming headlines looking for articles to read on your break (even if its true). I bet you can guess how I learned that one.

So why not Facebook? Don’t get me wrong. I like Facebook. I think, on balance, it’s more helpful than not despite some jerkishness on the part of Zuckerman et al. But Facebook started, in spring of 2012, to decide for you which of your friends and pages are valuable to you, on an algorithm that isn’t close to perfect. It had two purposes in this.

First, it was trying to ensure that you saw first the articles you wanted most to read – your closest friends, your favorite pages – but second, it was increasing revenue for itself.

It is now significantly more expensive for advertisers to use Facebok. It used to be an ‘organic’ way to discover new pages, where you just kind of ‘naturally’ picked them up. Now Facebook deliberately makes it harder for you to find new pages, and the owners of the pages need to pay Facebook for the privilege of making it easier to find them.

I don’t blame Facebook for wanting to make a buck. They’re not in it for charity, after all. But speaking as someone trying to get people to read my website, they are now a very expensive option, rather than an inexpensive one, to let people know about my site.

RSS doesn’t exactly advertise my website or anyone elses’, but it does make it really simple for people who already want to read it to find the new articles I post nearly every day. Really simple syndication – and yet most people who are on the web haven’t figured out how to use it on a regular basis.

Oh, and if you’re curious, my own RSS feed of other peoples’ stuff is fed to the left hand column on my site pages (‘below the fold’ a bit), listed as ‘blogroll’, and the most recent couple of articles are linked on my curated life page (which, unfortunately, is glitchy because of the app used to set it up. Looking for better. Help?). Feel free to add any or all of them to your feed. Happy reading!

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This little video has a catchy tune and an important message: Don’t do dumb stuff that will kill you.

For many years, an unofficial competition has raged, the Darwin Awards. At the link you will find over 400 documented cases of ‘What the f*ck was he/she thinking” for which we will never know the answer because the person died.

There’s a tendency to a great deal of schadenfreude in these cases, and to some extent, rightly so. When a person has spent his life fighting helmet laws and dies from a head injury after a car wreck it’s funny, right?

Except that it’s not. And deep down we know it, and that’s why we laugh. To err is human. “Man is the animal that laughs at himself” as Valentine Michael Smith said (via Robert Heinlein). And we laugh at ourselves because it hurts so bad. So yeah. Sometimes we abandon compassion, for a moment, because the ultimate human moment is to laugh at death, and the many, many ways we bring it on.

And then, we get back to shared joy and shared pain. We continue to try to improve our lives and the lives of others around us. We abandon judgment and embrace compassion. We seek knowledge. And still, we get it wrong. To err is human, remember?

As Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) said:

Easier To Fool

Mark Twain (from Facebook meme, originally from an image in public domain)

People believe a lot of untrue things, sometimes as many (to misquote the White Queen) as three before breakfast.

I’m sometimes guilty of that myself. But my challenge for myself, over the next several years, is to use my compassion and my ability to write to help people distinguish between useful knowledge and ‘knowledge’ that causes problems for people by preventing them from investigating further, which is perhaps one of the best definitions of truth.

The Darwin Awards (film)

The Darwin Awards (film) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Back to the Darwin awards. There are lots of dumb ways to die. We invent more every day. It’s entirely possible that you or I might succumb to one of those. More importantly, however, there are a lot of dumb ways to live, ways that hurt us and the people around us, and we don’t have a nifty internet meme to identify them  and point and laugh.

Maybe instead we shoule be looking for ways to teach, to share, and to help people, rather than laughing and judging. So yeah, go ahead and laugh. The video, especially, is adorable. And then…

Maybe its time to start identifying ways to live better, and to keep on spreading joy until there’s no room for the sort of fear and hate that keep infecting the world. Or as Lennon said, ‘Give peace a chance’.

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Doctor Who TARDIS Mk VII

TARDIS Mk VII (Photo credit: >Rooners)

The Doctor in Doctor Who is the embodiment of quantum physics. His D&D alignment is Lawful Good, because he is the law (of time), which of course is chaos, which makes it all confusing. At least, that’s how I see it.

Is he another British metaphor for Jesus, like Aslan and Gandalf? Or is he something else entirely? If so, what? And what is the Tardis (or who)? Is it intentional that the Tardis makes me think of R2D2?

What is it that makes us love the Doctor through eleven (soon to be twelve) incarnations? Is it his compassion? His joie de vivre? His silliness? His completely mindful living in the present?

Please feel free to discuss. The best of science fiction always has a philosophical underpinning, which is what builds our suspension of disbelief. It explores our universe, our humanity, the meaning of life.

What does Doctor Who mean to you?

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Rolling Jubilee

Wipe our Debt (Photo credit: Images_of_Money)

Occupy Wall Street has found a very interesting new cause to pursue, and are rolling it out on November 15th (which happens to be my dad’s 80th birthday. Happy birthday, Daddy!). They are raising money to buy up debt for pennies on the dollar and forgive it. It’s called Rolling Jubilee and there’s a good editorial by Douglas Rushkoff about it on CNN here.

Rushkoff brings up the ‘moral hazard’ issue and deals with it pretty well, simply by equating personal debt forgiveness with the business debt forgiveness that has already been done by government on a massive scale. There’s more to it than that, however.

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http://shankargallery.livejournal.com/

http://shankargallery.livejournal.com/ (Photo credit: shankargallery)

Mr Migraine is visiting today, so in lieu of the post I intended to work on today, I’m going to introduce you to some writers of fine articles and poems I have found on the web. Curated links and editing old posts seem to be the extent of my intellectual capacity today. Enjoy!

Elizabethann, who also goes by Elsie (in my tree) has been writing beautiful and challenging poetry for many years on Livejournal. Sometimes it borders on doggerel in style, but in a really good way (much like Robert Service). It is the subject matter that can be challenging.

Elsie, as she tells it in her journal, has had a very difficult life, and her ambivalence about how it has affected her is a frequent topic of her poetry. It can be shocking and hard to read even as its beauty and lyricism is compelling. Here, go have a look at her latest, and then look back over others she has posted.

Cathain has written a scathing indictment of What is Wrong with Kansas? Cait is from Kansas, and I live a scant dozen miles (or less) from Kansas, with family and friends on the Jayhawks side of the border. I think Cait accurately lays the problems in the state at the feet of ideology. I would be interested in solutions that the readers of this post can come up with, because I suspect they will be more widely applicable after the next midterms.

From Daily Kos comes an article about veiled threats being bantered around about ‘making Joe Biden President’. My observation: Our contry (the US) is a representative democracy. Voting is a bloodless revolution every four years. If you don’t like the outcome of the revolution, rather than bring blood in it, seek to have the next bloodless revolution turn your way.

Lest you think I have nothing good to say about business owners and people in power, there’s this: The owner of Bob’s Red Mill is giving his company to his employees.

Finally, I have seen this video mentioned in Huffington Post several times from friends on Facebook. It gives me the giggles, partially, in fact, because my husband can compete with those handsome fellas in the video in every particular except in the whole being gay thing: Gay Men will Marry Your Girlfriends

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Imperial Daleks

Imperial Daleks (Photo credit: Kaptain Kobold)

But first, a quick introduction. I am a sophomore in high school, with decent grades in most classes, lots friends of varying styles, personalities, and morals, and a joy to experience many things and this has led to an interest of philosophy and so I think about EVERYTHING too much. I will lead you into conversations about zombies, Daleks, cooking, music, books, tv shows, video games, and philosophy. If any of you wish to rage about “teens today” then come to me, and I will often rage rage with you.

Now to the challenge:

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Article first published as The Attack on Planned Parenthood Feels Personal on Technorati. (link is now broken)

About 26 years ago, I was a teenage girl as HIV was just starting to hit the newspapers and was still the “gay disease”. I’d fallen head over heels over a guy at school who was smart, talented, funny, and absolutely wrong for me (weren’t they all, back then) and I wanted to “do it” in the worst way.
I went down to my local Planned Parenthood, and with minimal fuss and bother, and without costing me a dime, I got my very first pap smear, a thorough physical, and a prescription for the pill, with instructions on how to use it. They also advised that I should use condoms and absolutely didn’t believe that I was still a virgin. I didn’t get pregnant, didn’t catch an incurable disease, and my heart was only a little bit broken when our relationship ended.
I got married at 19 (still with the not so bright choices). I continued to use Planned Parenthood for my pap smears and birth control until I was finally covered by an employer’s health care plan in my mid twenties. A Planned Parenthood doctor diagnosed the abnormal cells in my pap smear that I had cryosurgery for when I was twenty-four, and they gave me advice on what birth control to use after my oldest (planned) son was born.
Now Planned Parenthood is under (continued) attack in Congress. In the city of Racine, WI, 3,200 use Planned Parenthood as their primary health care provider – just like I did until I got health insurance. They receive pap smears, pregnancy tests, HIV testing and counseling, and that health care saves lives, just like it saved mine. And not one penny of Federal money pays for a single abortion.
Let me repeat that. Not one penny of Federal money pays for abortion. This has been the case since the mid 1970s. Federal money accounts for 30% of Planned Parenthood’s budget, in Racine WI, in Kansas City, MO, in Tallahassee, Fl, all over the country. And in little towns and rural areas between the cities, where Planned Parenthood is the only provider for hundreds of thousand or millions of women, if Planned Parenthood loses that Federal money, women will die.

For now, until the next vote, Planned Parenthood is safe. But be ready, because the next vote is coming, and Planned Parenthood will again be in the sights of those who are using it to gain political advantage. So before the next round, speak out, blog out, and support Planned Parenthood.

I want to expand here on my original article, to discuss the concept of the personal as political.  It is a concept integral to feminism, but applicable to many other areas of life.  The idea is that no political idea can ever be viewed solely in the “pure light of reason” because politics, by its nature, has significant consequences for real people.  It cannot be purely theoretical any more than than any other science involving human subjects.

There is, however, one big distinction between politics and other sciences that involve human subjects — in order to experiment in other fields, such as psychology or sociology, you must carefully evaluate the risks to your human subjects, and then submit the study design to a review board of fellow scientists for an ethics review.  In politics, however, human subjects research begins the minute a law is passed or an executive order is handed down or a court decision is reached.

This is why utopian political systems invariably don’t work as advertised (this includes socialism, communism, and libertariansim, as well as Objectivism), and why the “Devil’s Advocate” argument that starts with “Let’s pretend for a second that the world is like X” are inherently dishonest and useful only to identify those who are trying to sell you something.

Politics affects lives, and there’s nowhere in the world where people are not impacted by it.  That is why when you are building a political ideology, you can’t rely solely on philosophy and logic.  You have to consider the real people and real consequences, and you have to take actual, rather than idealized human nature into account.

So when you decide to pass a law that directly impacts approximately 0.04% of the population of a minority population in France, but do it in such a sweeping way that you are thereby including the entire minority population under the tag “possible terrorists”  as one of your defined variables, your experiment would never, ever pass a peer review.

 

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Or: Why Liberals Support Food Stamps and other Government Food Programs:

CC by The Shopping Sherpa
Philosophers created the science of epistemology to explore how we know what we know and have been grappling with it for at least 4000 years without firm resolution. In today’s world, the issue is an incredibly complex one. We have multiple sources of information, with varying degrees of reliability and validity, and we often don’t know for sure which sources are more and which are less reliable.
This post assumes that you have a basic grasp of the scientific method and logic and critical thinking skills. Given that, and given what we know, and how we know, how do we decide how to live our lives? Usually, we make a moral decision about the nature of the world, and build our belief system to match it from the pieces of information we discover that most support our belief system.
Mankind is not primarily ‘the rational animal’, but the rationalizing animal. This has been demonstrated in experiment after experiment (ironic, I know). We often start from a conclusion we want to reach and build backwards to achieve philosophical unity with the conclusion. Scientists and people of faith (not a mutually exclusive group) are equally guilty of this, and with good reason. Our information overload leaves us with greater, not less, uncertainty, as we have to weigh many more variables.
Belief systems are frameworks that we build to make sense of our world. They are made up of many assumptions about the nature of knowing, about the reliability of facts, and about the nature of our relationship to other humans and the larger world.
Dunbar’s number (popularized as the ‘monkeysphere’) helps to understand why many humans are unable to empathize with people who are significantly different from them. If your social circle (monkeysphere) consists totally or almost totally of people who are essentially just like you are, it’s easy to fall into the belief that others (’Those People’) are fundamentally different from you.
How we react to those outside our monkeysphere in large part is defined by the two broadest classes of political philosophy. Liberalism rejects the ‘fundamental difference’ belief, while conservatism embraces it. It’s the question of what to do with ‘those people’.
Liberals generally assume that all human beings are intrinsically valuable (like we are) and we build systems outside the monkeysphere in order to provide as many opportunities as possible to potentiate (lovely word, that) their intrinsic value. In other words, ‘those people’ are just like me.
For instance,as a liberal, I might feed hungry people I’ve never met, and use my government’s food assistance as an automatic deposit system to set up a system to do so, because I assume that those other people, like me, have intrinsic value. Our primary view of those outside of our monkeysphere is that they are just like the people inside our monkeysphere, but not yet known to us, with the same basic needs, wants, urges, and potential, expressed, perhaps, in different ways.
Conservatives generally view those outside their own monkeysphere in one of three ways: Some ‘others’ are inferior in some way to the conservative and thus available to be used or thrown away. Other people outside the monkeysphere are a threat to a conservative, in which case he feels justified in depriving the other (’Those People’, again) in order to minimize the threat. Finally, some others are irrelevant to the conservative, in which case he doesn’t feel the need to consider the impact of his actions on them in any way.
A conservative, therefore, must allow a person into their monkeysphere, at least provisionally or tribally, in order to provide food assistance. A person must be ‘like me’ (race, class, or aspirations) in order to ‘deserve’ food assistance. A conservative can be just as generous as a liberal, so long as he has, to some extent, decided that this particular non-monkeysphere person or group has provisionally earned personhood.
In addition, the conservative is going to weigh whether it is useful to him to feed the other (he might support food stamps on the grounds that he will then be able to hire workers for lower wages without consequences in terms of their ability to perform the work). If a conservative views an outsider as a threat (racism comes to play here), he will actively fight providing aid to a group, viewing it as counter to his interests. This has been a primary driver of health care debates.
(CC by Jeffrey Beall) Which of these people deserves to eat?

As a conservative, I might volunteer at a food bank, or give a check to victims of a hurricane, or support a cause I grew to know through some personal connection, but it is anathema to me that others that I haven’t ‘pre-approved’ would get care that I in part pay for through a government program. This does not change even if I or someone I know benefits from this program, as I can then rationalize my monkeysphere-central acceptance of help as a ‘special case’.In the aggregate, conservatives live deep within their monkeyspheres and guard the borders. Liberals build bridges and roads between monkeyspheres and visit every now and again to see how things are going. It is up to the reader to decide which sort of life is more likely to lead to a better world.

 

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The full article that inspired this post is here at Sociological Images

The author of this response, Beau Sia, has posted an excellent performance piece on the basic concepts of privilege and prejudice, in the voice of Alexandra Wallace of UCLA, without mocking her for being female, or for having large breasts. It is very refreshing to see a response that doesn’t rely on misogyny.  Watch the whole piece.

His piece does not only apply to Asians in the library, but to young Black men at the grocery store, or women at the construction site, or Muslims at the high school.  This is a fundamental bit of education, done in an entertaining fashion, that applies to the concept of privilege more broadly than the original prompt.  Beau Sia’s YouTube bio lists him as an Oklahoman who currently lives in New York City and is a slam poet, whose parents are Chinese immigrants from the Philippines.

This also goes back to the series that Chally at Feministe is doing about origins, titled Where Are You From (parts 1, 2, 3 and 4), and who really belongs someplace.  I am a Caucasian American, and most places I’ve been, I felt like I belonged, with one exception.  In the deep south, when visiting, I was clearly a Yankee, and it was made clear to me that if I lived the rest of my life there, I would never belong.

Beau Sia makes a poignant case (as does the Feministe series) that many, many Americans never have the experience that I have, that I am automatically accepted as belonging.  In some cases, as in the ever increasing hysteria on the Right regarding Hispanic Immigrants and Muslims, the ‘not belonging’ of it all is vicious hostility.

This has been perennially an issue for African Americans and women, two groups (among others) that wake up every day with the sure knowledge (conscious or unconscious) that the world they live in wasn’t built for them and doesn’t reflect their values.

Unconscious privilege is an insidious trap, and it is easy to get caught in it.  This makes Daniel Jose Older’s piece “Beyond Manning Up”, in Racialicious all the more astounding.  As an EMT, Older describes the process he went through as he realized, slowly and gradually, how normal violence against women is in our society, how utterly banal.

He compares the stages of understanding privilege to the stages of grief, and it is an apt description.  When you have been raised to believe in a “level playing field”, which is a truly wonderful ideal, to allow yourself to stop believing that it exists is a deep loss. He rightfully concludes, however, that getting to the final stage, understanding, is only the beginning.

I can only hope that Miss Alexandra Wallace at UCLA learns a similar lesson, and that the rest of us can take something from her example, the fine response of Beau Sia, the series by Chally at Feministe, and the excellent article by Daniel Jose Older.

 

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Sunset at Huntington Beach, California.

Sunset at Huntington Beach, California. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Turns out there was good reason for Love and Consequences by Margaret (Peggy) B. Jones to not be named “Truth and Consequences”. There was no truth in it, and Margaret was afraid of the consequences.

Turns out Margaret B. Jones, (supposedly half white, half Native American, poverty class) was actually Margaret Seltzer, an all white woman from Sherman Oaks, a wealthy suburb of Los Angeles. She “borrowed” the stories of people she worked with while doing anti-poverty and white ally work in Los Angeles gang territories, and worked them into a “memoir” about “her” difficult life.

There are so many things wrong with what Ms. Seltzer did that it’s difficult to pick a “worst”, but my vote would be on the betrayal of all those who considered her an ally by appropriating their stories for profit, without credit, without attribution.

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